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Wear Your Best Bonnet to the Revolution

Rebecca Riots.  One of at least 10 peasant and worker uprisings in Celtic lands during the 18th and 19th century invoking sovereignty goddesses, land spirits, Fairy Witches, and other mysterious, usually female beings.  In many of these movements, men wore dresses and bonnets.

The Welsh ‘Rebecca Riots.’ One of many peasant and worker uprisings in Celtic lands during the 18th and 19th century invoking sovereignty goddesses, land spirits, crones, Fairy Witches, and other mysterious, usually female otherworldly beings. In many of these movements, men wore dresses and bonnets.  Other figures invoked included Maeve, Ludd (possibly Llud or Lugh), and Sadhbh.


 

This week on Gods&Radicals:

Druid and Author of God-Speaking, Judith O’Grady, will appear on Monday with an essay regarding the existence of Evil.

On Wednesday, look for Mark Shekoyan‘s discussion of Pan.

And on Friday, we’ll host an essay by Heathen Chinese, called “Are the Gods on Our Side?”

Links of Interest

Wanna see what our lust for technology is doing to earth? Here’s a horror story.

Called “Pagan” by one local Christian priest, a wooden temple was constructed and burned to heal ancestral trauma in Northern Ireland.

Peter Grey, author of Apocalyptic Witchcraft and the very-oft quoted Rewilding Witchcraft, has published another profound speech on technology, witchcraft, and how we’re giving away our power:

Should you worry about “The New Right” and their co-option of Paganism? Yes, and academic Amy Hale succinctly argues why.

 And the long-awaited Draft Pagan Statement on the Environment is ready for public comment! You may note the absence of a certain “C” word, though….

Glossary: Commodification

Literally, to turn something into a commodity, or to abstract it so that it can be bought, sold, and traded.

The process by which something becomes objectified, reduced to an abstraction of itself, and requiring it to be removed from the social relation that produced it.

Any thing which can be bought and sold is a commodity, but Capitalism constantly requires ‘new markets’ and new ways of making money, so things which were historically never subject to sale on markets (land, most importantly) eventually become commodities because of this pressure.  Everything is for sale within Capitalism, and things thought sacred or set-apart from the market often cannot stay that way.

Water’s a great example of this.  Water falls from the sky in the form of rain, wells from the earth, flows in rivers, and settles in lakes and ponds.  It is, in essence, ‘free,’ or readily abundant in Nature.  Now, however, it is something to be bought in bottles at stores.  In order to maintain such an odd or ‘unnatural’ state of affairs, access to water must be limited, and thus aquifers are often sold to private companies, particularly in the southern hemisphere, and the poor have been forbidden from drawing off ancestral wells.

Related terms: Enclosure, Commodity Fetishism, Appropriation.

And this week’s quotes, from early 1800’s anti-Capitalist revolts:

 

The law locks up the man or woman
Who steals the goose from off the common
But leaves the greater villain loose
Who steals the common from the goose.
(Anonymous anti-Enclosure Pamphlet, 1821)

and

No General but Ludd
Means the Poor Any Good
(Luddite slogan, 1811)

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